Apr
24
Tue
Georeferencing @ Brody Learning Commons 4040, Homewood Campus
Apr 24 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Scanned images of early maps and aerial photography often provide an ideal historical backdrop upon which to overlaying contemporary geospatial data. You will be amazed at how georeferenced maps can be used to identify changes in both the physical and cultural landscape. In this class, we will introduce georeferencing and walk through the steps and decisions one makes throughout the process. You will also learn how to upload and share your final georeferenced maps to ArcGIS Online.

This is a hands-on session where you will make use of the library’s extensive collection of local scanned map images. We’ll also bring in authoritative GIS data layers from Baltimore City and our Maryland State government. There is no prerequisite for this class. Some knowledge of GIS may prove useful. <Register here>

May
1
Tue
Best Practices for Research Data Management and Sharing @ Brody Learning Commons 4040, Homewood Campus
May 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Effective data management can increase the pace of the research process, contribute to the soundness of research results, and meet funding agency requirements by making research data easy to share.  Join us for an overview of best practices including backup procedures, tips on effective file names, data security and access controls, and data documentation/metadata. This seminar is for faculty, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students from all disciplines. This course does not focus on creating or using any particular data collection or analysis tool (e.g. REDCap, SPSS), but discusses data management at a general level. <Register here><Handouts>

May
8
Tue
Collector for ArcGIS @ Brody Learning Commons 4040, Homewood Campus
May 8 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Learn how to use the Collector for ArcGIS application for data gathering out in the field. In this class we will practice setting up data collection templates and learn how templates integrate with ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro. We will show and discuss configuration best practices and walk through an exercise editing data collected by multiple users. This is a hands-on session that will include the option to download the Collector application to your mobile device – iOS or Android. Weather permitting, we’ll head outdoors to preview data collection from the perspective of a student or field worker with no previous GIS experience. There is no prerequisite for this class. Some knowledge of GIS may prove useful. <Register here>

May
21
Mon
Introduction to Network Analysis: Basic Concepts, Applications, and Tools @ Lab#1, 2024 Building, Medical Campus
May 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

What comes to mind when you hear the term network? The Internet? Facebook? Multiple computers sharing information? What if I told you there was a whole realm of scholarship where researchers explore the patterns of interaction in and among networks in their many forms? Network analysis is a research method that scholars in disciplines from public health, to business, to sociology and etc. use to explore and visualize relationships between objects, entities, or people. In this workshop we will take an introductory look at this concept and the basic underlying components of the method as well as discuss some ways that researchers are currently using the method. We’ll also identify types of online tools and software, discuss how to choose the best option for you, and construct a basic data set in excel. Finally, time permitting we will have a short demo of a network analysis visualization tool. This is a basic introduction, no prior experience is necessary. Attendees may wish to bring a laptop to follow along.  <Register Here>

Best Practices for Research Data Management and Sharing @ Lab #1, 2024 E Monument Building
May 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Effective data management can increase the pace of the research process, contribute to the soundness of research results, and meet funding agency requirements by making research data easy to share.  Join us for an overview of best practices including backup procedures, tips on effective file names, data security and access controls, and data documentation/metadata. This seminar is for faculty, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students from all disciplines. This course does not focus on creating or using any particular data collection or analysis tool (e.g. REDCap, SPSS), but discusses data management at a general level. <Register here><Handouts>

 

Jun
6
Wed
Open Science and Reproducible Research Tools  @ Brody Learning Commons 4040, Homewood Campus
Jun 6 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

What is the open science movement and what does it mean for me as a researcher? In this workshop we will look at the growing importance of open science and explore the issues surrounding making research and data open. As we discuss definitions, strategies, barriers, and incentives to open research we will also begin to take a look at tools that assist users in working in a transparent and reproducible manner. Specifically we will demo the Open Science Framework (OSF), a free, open source, online research project management platform where you can create a personal JHU affiliated account, manage multiple projects, and collaborate or share with other researchers. A prime example of a service that promotes reproducibility, we will share more about ways that you can use the OSF to position yourself as a proponent in the open science movement. <Register>

Jun
22
Fri
Open Science and Reproducible Research Tools  @ Lab#1, 2024 Building, Medical Campus
Jun 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

What is the open science movement and what does it mean for me as a researcher? In this workshop we will look at the growing importance of open science and explore the issues surrounding making research and data open. As we discuss definitions, strategies, barriers, and incentives to open research we will also begin to take a look at tools that assist users in working in a transparent and reproducible manner. Specifically we will demo the Open Science Framework (OSF), a free, open source, online research project management platform where you can create a personal JHU affiliated account, manage multiple projects, and collaborate or share with other researchers. A prime example of a service that promotes reproducibility, we will share more about ways that you can use the OSF to position yourself as a proponent in the open science movement. <Register>

Jun
25
Mon
Introduction to R for Absolute Beginners @ BLC 5015/5017 (Homewood Campus)
Jun 25 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

R is an open source software for statistical computing and graphics. This Introduction to R workshop is for people who want to learn this data analysis tool but have little or no experience in any programming languages. The first half of this 3-hour workshop will focus on some basic concepts of coding and the second half will have several hands-on activities to learn basic R skills, such as installing R packages, importing and exploring dataSome troubleshooting tips and R resources will be provided at the end of this workshop. <Register here>